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Point Reyes National Seashore houses an incredible amount of wildlife diversity that includes elephant seals, the endemic Tule elks, and black oystercatchers to name a few (I wish I could list all the animals I have seen, but I'll be kind to the readers). If you have a particular animal you have been looking forward to seeing and adding to your list, Point Reyes will likely offer the opportunity to spot it. Luckily for me,…
Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Go Big or Go Home

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What is going on everyone! Let’s give a shout out to the weather. The weather changes within minutes here in Alaska. You wake up with the sun shining bright in the sky, and you decide to go out in shorts and a t-shirt. However, you return drenched in water because it’s raining. But back to business. Our model here in the KLGO (Klondike Goldrush) is “go big or go home,” and this was the week…
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En route to some bee monitoring field work, I got to spend some time with my boss on a lengthy drive through the park. Joshua Trees and granite boulders slide across the landscape, and I decide to take advantage of this time to ask him questions about the National Park Service and what role he plays. As a scientist, I’m interested to know what kind of research he does - I even asked him what…
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This second week of my L.H.I.P. internship at CHAM was really fun, we continued our oral history project at a community partner institution. In addition we started discussing and implementing the direction of my project for the summer which would consist of finishing the inventory of non-accessioned items at CHAM in order to update the Scope of Collections Statement. I made some interesting discoveries while conducting the inventory, among some random items I found the…
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Hello everyone! This week was a success as I did my first “Grant Tree Walk”! It was about 40 minutes long and I got to share with many visitors how important our role is in protecting Sequoia trees for future generations. I do have to say, at the beginning of my internship I was really nervous to talk to the visitors, but I have been blessed with an amazing staff as they have been very…
Friday, June 28, 2019

What is SEAC??

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The Southeast Archeological Center (SEAC) was founded in 1961 by the director of the National Park Service, Conrad. L Wirth. After the unfortunate decision to construct Interstate 16 through the Ocmulgee National Monument, the director put a plan in place to survey, preserve, and cause the least amount of damage possible to the site, ultimately resulting in the creation of SEAC. Since its origin over 50 years ago, SEAC has assisted 60 out of the…
Friday, June 28, 2019

Lupe

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I will keep this one very short because I can write an entire book about this special individual. Maria Guadalupe Lopez Arroyo is certainly the most influential person in my life and there's no chance I would be at this stage of my life without her countless of lessons and sacrifices. She was very strict and that was always difficult for me to understand through my entire childhood. Now that I have seen the results…
Friday, June 28, 2019

They Say it's "WILD"!

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What’s going on everyone! My name is Edgar Hernandez. This summer I will be the Interpretive and Outreach Intern representing the Latino Heritage Internship Program (LHIP) at the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Skagway, Alaska. I am from the Pico-Union neighborhood in the outskirts of Downtown, Los Angeles. Interesting facts about me: (1) I had a guinea pig for 8 years named squishy who I loved, (2) I played collegiate rugby, (3) I…
Friday, June 28, 2019

The Future Is Bear

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What’s going on everyone! A lot of great things happened this week. First, let’s pay our respects to the bears. This week in the KLGO we had our first bear advisory go into effect. We were advised not to hike on our own as there were reports of bears being too friendly with humans. I have yet to see a bear. I’m still on the fence on whether I want to see one though. Back…
Friday, June 28, 2019

From Maine to Pennsylvania

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With travel between Maine and Pennsylvania, these past few weeks at the Olmsted Center have been a whirlwind of learning and doing. Early in June, we (the Designing the Parks interns) were treated with a visit to Acadia National Park for a week of work, exploration, and bonding. With it being my first time visiting “the first national park east of the Mississippi” (as it’s cheerfully referred to on many an NPS publication), its Lakeview…
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My second week on the job & what can I can say while I am knee deep in water. As a Marine I am no stranger to having a heavy backpack and squishy socks because of training or a mission. On this day we were patrolling my summer LHIP home away from home… the Hole-In-The-Donut searching for the not so elusive and not so rare Southern Cattail (T. domingensis). All field operations ecological or military…
Thursday, June 27, 2019

Bainbridge Adventure!

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Bainbridge Island was one of the first places in the United States that moved Japanese families to Japanese internment camps after the Pearl Harbor bombings. We visited the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial, where the stories of the Japanese families are told and remembered, so that it can never happen again to other cultures. It was an amazing experience to see how the memorial depicts their experiences and how the Bainbridge community stayed strong during hard…
Thursday, June 27, 2019

Goin' with the Flow!

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Last Saturday, I was fortunate enough to participate in a kayak trip along the Intracoastal Waterway behind Fort Moultrie. I thought it was fantastic that my job for the day was simply to paddle along. That's something I can definitely get used to! It was a really exciting trip to be a part of because I was able to see a variety of wildlife that was different from what I would normally encounter walking around…
Thursday, June 27, 2019

THE GUTENBERG BIBLE?!?!?!

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What is 563 years old, Latin, & on display at the Library of Congress? You guessed right, it’s the Gutenberg bible! Twas the year 1455, when Johann Gutenberg decided to print one of the very first books on his very first mechanical printing press. On that day, the dispersal of knowledge and circulation of wisdom changed for the good of humanity. During the last couple of weeks, I have had the honor to do research…
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Homestead National Monument of America is full of history, the best ones are those from visitors who tell how their ancestors came to homestead in America from different parts of the world. I especially love to hear volunteer’s stories since they are aware of the importance of the Homestead Act, like Marcella who told me that her grandparents came from far away to homestead in Nebraska. Marcella’s grandfather was from Sweden and her grandmother from…
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