Blog
Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Learning how to handle bats!

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When my supervisor asked me if I would be comfortable handling bats I very quickly and excitedly answered “YES!” I have always enjoyed seeing these mysterious creatures flying around my campsites at dusk. As a birder, I would rush to grab my binoculars hoping to make out their features against the night sky. I would think, “If I could just see them for one second I’m sure I can ID them!” Of course in the…
Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Why are bats so important?

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As a biology assistant intern, I will be helping the bat crew collect important data on the distribution and abundance of bats! Bats are incredible little critters, they are a very valuable species that play a big role in keeping the insect population in check. Out of the 150 different species of bats found in North America about 70% are insectivores. Their appetite helps farmers across the world and it is estimated that in the…
Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Sullivan's Island, the Real Treasure!

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I, having just left the University of Florida after pursuing a bachelor's degree in English, love all things story related. I especially love a good spooky story. For this internship I was to move to Charleston to work for and through the community (which I am finding completely gratifying and wonderful). I did a bit of research about what the community would be like moving into town, but I had not researched who exactly had…
Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Teamwork Time!

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Although I’ve always had to plan events for smaller groups of people throughout college because of my various work environments, I’ve always done so alone. Recently, in preparation for Latino Conservation Week and the Annual Sweetgrass Basket Festival in Mount Pleasant, I and the rest of the team here at Fort Moultrie and Fort Sumter have had our hands and calendars full. In the past three days I’ve had five meetings with completely different entities.…
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¡Hola a todos! When I am not giving interpretive programs, you can most likely find me at the visitor center answering visitor questions and trip planning. I hadn’t realized this before but working a visitor center desk, you need to know a LOT of information. Like an encyclopedic amount of knowledge. My first shift at the desk, I did not know much about anything at all. I barely knew where I was on the map…
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When I was first interviewed about this LHIP position at Everglades National Park, I thought to myself I am going to lose so much weight this summer… Then they told me I was going to work at the Hole in the Donut… I instantly reflected on the Dunkin Donuts commercial when he rolls out of bed and remarks, It Time to Make the Donuts. I was in a state of shock that there was a…
Friday, June 21, 2019

Hello and Welcome to my Blog!

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Bienvenidos, My name is Vanessa Colegio and this summer I will be serving as an intern with the National Park Service coordinating volunteer outreach and recruitment. I was born in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and raised in Laredo, Texas. For those of you who may not be familiar, Laredo is located in South Texas, which is border town with Mexico. I am proud to say that I am a recent first generation graduate from Texas A&M…
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Hi, again! I can’t believe I have already been interning in the Office of Communications & Office of International Affairs for a month now. These past weeks have given me a plethora of new opportunities, outside and inside the workplace, to grow communication skills vital to my future career. My biggest accomplishment so far has been placing my guidance page for Latino Conservation Week on the internal National Park Service website. Something new that I…
Thursday, June 20, 2019

Fish are Friends not Food

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This season I will be taking on an interpretation project focused on fish species and fishing in Rocky Mountain National Park. Within the park you can find Brown, Rainbow, Brook, Lake, and various types of Cutthroat Trout. There has been a lot of confusion in the past due to the diversity of Cutthroat trout found in this part of Colorado. An overwhelming variation of genetics was discovered in 2012 through genetic testing which led to…
Thursday, June 20, 2019

Sketch-Measure-Scan

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Hello, Welcome back to my blog! The past four weeks have been very fun and exciting over here in Washington DC. I've been learning so much about how to do proper documentation and using programs to process different kinds of data. The truth is nobody can ruin the hype or the fun that I'm having while I'm doing my work. This week I'll talk to you about what the documentation process involves and how its…
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My name is Alejandro Garcia. I live in El Paso, Texas and I will be working at the Chamizal National Memorial here on the US-Mexico border. I am currently completing my Master's degree in history at UTEP, where I focus on public history and borderlands history. This internship will be my first, and I am looking forward to working with the National Park Service (NPS) and engaging in cultural resource work at the park. I…
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What Does Marilyn Monroe & Pa-hay-okee have in common? Everglades National Park is literally called the River Of Grass (or Pa-hay-Okee ~ grassy waters)... As an ecosystem it holds world-class titles; for example she earned International Biosphere Reserve (1976) by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), three years later she was awarded the World Heritage Site (1979) , she was awarded Wetland of International Importance (1987) by the Ramsar Convention , and…
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In my last blog post, I introduced myself and the resource monitoring work I will be doing at Dinosaur National Monument later this summer. I will be lucky to spend time in the field collecting data on Monarch Butterflies, as well as working on projects to educate visitors about the butterflies. I expect that there will be lots of families visiting Dinosaur to see the fossils – young kids are notorious for loving dinosaurs and…
Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Inspiration in the air!

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Living at Sequoia National Park I have been fortunate to meet wonderful people from all over the country of different backgrounds. The quality of life here is much simpler than what I normally am used to in Los Angeles, but I actually really enjoy it. Considering that there is no phone service, people are forced to become social and interact. I’ll be quite honest it can take a while to get used to as one…
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¡Hola a todos! As an interpretive intern, my first program is the Big Tree Talk. It is a 20 minute educational talk all about Sequoia trees, the biggest trees in the whole world! To prepare, I’ve researched and shadowed the interpretive park ranger’s talks in order to get ideas. My talk focuses on the Sequoias survival at each stage of their life and the negative/positive human history associated with the trees. Sequoia trees produce millions…
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I had the privilege of meeting Maria during the first 2 weeks at Klondike, and I was lucky enough to interview her before she left. Below is the bio report I wrote for Maria that was posted on the park's Facebook: "Please join us in saying thank you to Maria Pinto, our park's AARP volunteer for a wonderful year of memories that will not be forgotten. Maria’s favorite memory is when she was able to…
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