Blog
Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Inspiration in the air!

Written by
Living at Sequoia National Park I have been fortunate to meet wonderful people from all over the country of different backgrounds. The quality of life here is much simpler than what I normally am used to in Los Angeles, but I actually really enjoy it. Considering that there is no phone service, people are forced to become social and interact. I’ll be quite honest it can take a while to get used to as one…
Written by
¡Hola a todos! As an interpretive intern, my first program is the Big Tree Talk. It is a 20 minute educational talk all about Sequoia trees, the biggest trees in the whole world! To prepare, I’ve researched and shadowed the interpretive park ranger’s talks in order to get ideas. My talk focuses on the Sequoias survival at each stage of their life and the negative/positive human history associated with the trees. Sequoia trees produce millions…
Written by
I had the privilege of meeting Maria during the first 2 weeks at Klondike, and I was lucky enough to interview her before she left. Below is the bio report I wrote for Maria that was posted on the park's Facebook: "Please join us in saying thank you to Maria Pinto, our park's AARP volunteer for a wonderful year of memories that will not be forgotten. Maria’s favorite memory is when she was able to…
Monday, June 17, 2019

Here's the Tea

Written by
My first couple of weeks at the Department of Interior as the Archaeology Junior Ranger Booklet Designer have been nothing short of a learning experience. My job for the past couple of weeks has consisted of digging deep within the labyrinth of the DOI Library archives and doing some intense googling to look for archaeological evidence of Latinx heritage within the National Park Service. One interesting site with Latino archaeology is Big Bend Ntl Park.…
Sunday, June 16, 2019

On the water

Written by
This week consisted of going through several topics in training. Although I did sit an listen to a lot of important things, I also managed to eat about half of the bag of chocolates. One of the cool things that we did was visiting several sites such as Dismal Nitch, Salt Works in Seaside, Oregon, and the Yawn property. I would say that I enjoyed the Yawn property the most. I really liked the location…
Saturday, June 15, 2019

El Amenazado Chorlo Nevado

Written by
Chorlo nevado (Charadrius nivosus) or western snowy plover in English is a small shorebird that is distributed in the Western coast of North America. Unfortunately, the snowy plovers have been on the threatened list since 1993 due to poor reproductive success that is caused by a great number of disturbances. Threats include high human activity (potentially have caused an increase in predators) in breeding sites and alterations in these sites due to effects of the…
Friday, June 14, 2019

Learning About Giant Sequoia Trees

Written by
Hello Everyone! It has been quiet an adventure ever since I arrived to Kings Canyon National Park. From rainy, cold nights to sunny, warm days. My first week consisted of exploring Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. I was very excited to see for the very first time the largest tree in the world, the General Sherman tree! And I want you all to see it is as well so I have shared a picture…
Friday, June 14, 2019

Doing My Best Dorotea Impersonation

Written by
Hi! I am Sienna Córdoba, the Historical Interpretation Intern at Fort Larned Historic Site in Kansas. I have my master’s degree in Latin American and Environmental History from UC - Santa Barbara. I am so thrilled to be in Kansas this summer - it is absolutely fascinating and beautiful, such a hidden gem. Many people do not realize that the Hispanic exploration and settlement of the center of North America was early and extensive, beginning…
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Something New You Have Learned

Written by
How’s it going? This week I explored Giant Forest with the SIEN forest crew to monitor Sequoia health. We collected data on whether the trees were dead or alive, and the status of the tree’s foliage, which indicates stress levels. If a sequoia tree has “dieback”, or a certain amount of needle loss, this means that the tree can be under attack from beetles, have a lack of water or sunlight, or some other stressor…
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Settling into the Llama House

Written by
This summer I will have the privilege to call Rocky Mountain National Park my home. Rocky Mountain National Park or Romo for short, is made up of 415 square miles of protected federal public land that supports a wide variety of plants and wildlife. Surrounding the east side of the park, is the town of Estes Park. I am excited to begin this season and learn new things. The scenery in this part of Colorado…
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Opportunities for Growth!

Written by
Being at the park I have been given several opportunities to explore different positions offered at the National Park Service (NPS). So far I have received hands-on experience in assisting several division within natural resources such as, Hazard Tree Survey Crew, Inventory and Monitoring crew, tree demographics crew, and educational outreach. I have learned so far the different complexities and levels of assessments that vary from several positions previously mentioned. For instance, analyzing the impacting…
Thursday, June 13, 2019

A glimpse in my project

Written by
Serving as a multimedia outreach intern at the San Antonio Missions means that most of what I’m going to be doing will be focused on media. I will be working under the visual information specialist of the San Antonio Missions. I have one main project, which is producing three videos for the park. Two of the videos are aimed towards 4th graders, and the other video will be directed towards a more general audience. I…
Thursday, June 13, 2019

The Historical San Antonio Missions

Written by
The San Antonio Missions National Historical Park is different than most National Parks. It is comprised of four 18th century colonial missions that are located along the San Antonio River. A mission can be described as settlements that the Spanish set up for the indigenous people to learn how to be Spanish and become Spanish citizens. The four missions are Mission San Jose, Mission Concepcion, Mission San Juan, and Mission Espada. These missions are located…
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Hello Texas! (An Introduction)

Written by
Hello! This blog is going to be dedicated to my summer experience as an LHIP intern working at the San Antonio Missions Historic National Park. Being originally from Idaho, I had never been to Texas before, which made working in San Antonio a new and exciting opportunity. I drove around 27 hours to Texas and on my way got to enjoy the beautiful scenery of Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. San Antonio is a lot…
Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Week of Many Firsts.

Written by
Hello everyone! I just completed my second week in the KLGO. It was a week of many firsts. We completed our first week of training and we learned all about audience center techniques to allow visitors to connect with history on a personal level. We visited the trailhead for the infamous Chilkoot trail. This was a trail that was used by the goldseekers to reach the Gold fields in Dawson City (i.e., Canada). The trail…
Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Something new I have learned!

Written by
While being here at Klondike I have learned the essential role everyone plays within the department from the volunteers to the park rangers. Everyone contributes to the system, which allows everything run smoothly. Working at the visitor center, the volunteers have a plethora of information to offer to our guest that come in wanting to learn more about Seattle's role in the Klondike Gold Rush. I find it amazing that the people around me have…
Page 10 of 72