San Antonio Missions National Historical Park

Multimedia Outreach Intern  -  San Antonio, TX

Though San Antonio Missions National Historical Park is located in a predominantly Latino area in the city, Latinos are underrepresented in park visitation and in outdoor recreation activities.  The primary objective of this internship is to reach new and diverse audiences while engaging the next generation of park stewards by creating unique, relevant, intriguing media. The LHIP intern will creatively connect themes of culture, heritage, survival, and innovation with resource protection messages to connect with all types of learners and enhance field trip visits to the park. Park staff will guide the intern in using primary historic resources to integrate themes of diversity and Latino heritage with relevant park themes. For that reason, the intern will help the team to foster pride among locals - especially young local minority populations - of the historical roots of the vibrant community that surrounds the park.

The LHIP Multimedia Outreach internship is an opportunity for a motivated individual to assist San Antonio Missions National Historical Park to connect with the diverse local students by creating relevant, innovative, multimedia products for use at schools before and after their field trips to the park. As such, the intern and the park's Visual Media Specialist will together create a video series of at least three short (1-2 minute) video segments for use in local classrooms and on the park website, social media, and other platforms. It is a goal for the park to magnify the impact of their existing educational programs by creating the following videos:

  • At least one video produced by the intern will orient students to the park before their field trip. The primary audience for this video will be a diverse base of local 4th-grade students. This video will provide basic park history in a kid-friendly format. This orientation video will also help to protect our resources by encouraging safe, responsible behavior at park field trips. This video should be 1-3 minutes long.
  • The intern will also create at least one video to be shown in local classrooms after their field trip to the park. This video will help to solidify some of the information that students learned at the missions and make the trip a more memorable one for the young audience. The primary audience for this video will be a diverse base of local 4th-grade students. This video should be 1-2 minutes long.
  • For the last video produced by the intern, the intern will create one additional pre-visit orientation video geared toward older audiences, to be shown on group tour buses before their visit to the park. This video should be about 1 minute long.

Additionally, the intern will receive training in formal interpretation and gain experience in front-line interpretation by staffing the Visitor Center front desk and conducting roving interpretation at Mission San José. In this role, the intern will assist Park Rangers in conducting on-site and off-site interpretive programs when needed.

Qualifications: 

  • This position is open to students in diverse academic fields; however, students pursuing majors in - or related to - Communications, Film Studies, Videography might be a closer match.
  • Required skills in Adobe Premiere, videography, communications, and social media.
  • Be a self-starter and a good team player 
  • Have proficient Spanish Language skills.

Housing:  

This position does not offer park housing. If needed, the intern will receive a housing stipend within the budget limits. 

About San Antonio Missions National Historical Park: 

San Antonio is a major metropolitan area with a population that is more than 60 percent Hispanic. Though the national park is located in a predominantly Hispanic part of town, Hispanics are underrepresented in park visitation and in outdoor recreation activities in general. The San Antonio Missions tell the stories of the people who came into the Spanish missions to live in the 1700s. Acculturating and converting the indigenous population in order to become Spanish citizens reverberates today in the southwest United States.